CRISBERT I. CUALTEROS, M.D. - POSTSTREPTOCOCCAL REACTIVE ARTHRITIS.
   
DR. CRISBERT I. CUALTEROS
  Home
  Contact
  Facebook
  Twitter
  Youtube
  Video
  Medical Powerpoint Presentations
  Medicine Review Notes
  => apmc testpaper on anatomy
  => anatomy testpaper
  => prc anatomy testpaper
  => pharmacology
  => LEGAL MEDICINE
  => MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE
  => CHILDHOOD IMMUNIZATION
  => Seizures in Childhood
  => medical research
  => Malnutrition
  => shock
  => iron deficiency anemia
  => feeding of infants and children
  => CLIP LIP, PALATE
  => BASIC LIFE SUPPORT
  => Necrotizing Enterocolitis
  => ACR Clinical Classification Criteria for Rheumatoid Arthritis
  => ACR Clinical Classification Criteria for Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis
  => ACR Classification Criteria for Determining Progression of Rheumatoid Arthritis
  => ACR Classification Criteria for Determinining Clinical Remission in Rheumatoid Arthritis
  => ACR Classification Criteria of Functional Status in Rheumatoid Arthritis
  => ACR Guidelines for Medical Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis (updated April, 2002)
  => physician's licensure exam
  => POSTSTREPTOCOCCAL REACTIVE ARTHRITIS.
  => Rheumatic Fever
  => Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis
  => Postinfectious Arthritis and Related Conditions
  => Henoch-Schönlein Purpura
  => Measles (rubeola)
  => Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis
  => Rubella (German or three-day measles)
  => Mumps
  => POLIOVIRUSES
  => Varicella-zoster virus (VZV)
  => Roseola (Human Herpesviruses 6 and 7)
  => Acute Poststreptococcal Glomerulonephritis
  => Heart failure (HF)
  => Congenital Heart Disease in the Adult:
  => Asthma:
  => PNEUMONIA
  => Schistosomiasis and Other Trematode Infections
  => Peptic Ulcer Disease
  => Ischemic Heart Disease
  => CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASE
  => SYNOVIAL FLUID MUCIN-CLOT ("Ropes test")
  => Acute Renal Failure
  => Global Initiative For Asthma Guideline 2009
  => hemophilia A & B
  => dengue
  => Dengue Fever Facts
  => Dengue Fever - Yellow Book | CDC Travelers' Health
  => WHO | Dengue
  => Travel Health Service Dengue
  => Dengue Fever
  => cutaneous mastocytosis
  => Leukotriene-Receptor Inhibition
  => Mastocytosis: What It Is and How It's Diagnosed and Treated
  => Regression of Urticaria Pigmentosa in Adult Patients With Systemic Mastocytosis
  => Red-brown skin lesions and pruritus
  => mastocytosis case presentation
  => Mastocytosis: molecular mechanisms and clinical disease
  => MASTOCYTOSIS
  Clinical Practice Guidelines

CRISBERT I. CUALTEROS, M.D. Family and Medicine
Custom Search

Poststreptococcal reactive arthritis has been used to describe a syndrome characterized by the onset of acute arthritis following an episode of group A streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in a patient whose illness does not otherwise fulfill the Jones criteria for the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever. There is still considerable debate about whether this entity represents a distinct syndrome or is a manifestation of acute rheumatic fever. Although poststreptococcal reactive arthritis usually involves the large joints, in contrast to the arthritis of acute rheumatic fever, it may involve small peripheral joints as well as the axial skeleton and is typically nonmigratory. The latent period between the antecedent episode of group A streptococcal pharyngitis and the poststreptococcal reactive arthritis is considerably shorter (usually <10 days) than that typically seen with acute rheumatic fever. In contrast to the arthritis of acute rheumatic fever, poststreptococcal reactive arthritis does not respond dramatically to therapy with aspirin or other nonsteroidal inflammatory agents. Even though no more than half of the patients with poststreptococcal reactive arthritis who have a throat culture performed have group A streptococcal isolated, all have serologic evidence of a recent group A streptococcal infection. It has been reported that a small proportion of patients with poststreptococcal reactive arthritis may go on to develop valvular heart disease. Therefore, these patients should be carefully observed for several months for the subsequent development of carditis. Some physicians administer secondary prophylaxis to these patients for a period of up to 1 yr. If carditis is not observed, the prophylaxis can then be discontinued. If carditis is detected, the patient should be classified as having had acute rheumatic fever and should continue to receive secondary prophylaxis.

   

=> Do you also want a homepage for free? Then click here! <=
Family Medicine Physician